Thursday,
July 19, 2018

Thursday,
July 19, 2018

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In Print & On Air includes general interest media coverage of UT Dallas students, faculty, staff and leadership and their achievements. To receive In The News, an occasional email bulletin featuring selected media coverage of UT Dallas, subscribe online.

KERA-FM

UT Dallas Chemist on Plastic: Once an 'Exciting Frontier,' Now an Environmental Burden

July 18, 2018

“Here's the dirty little secret about recycling plastics: Of all the recyclable plastics that are collected, only 14 percent are actually put into a recycle stream.” — Dr. Bruce Novak, dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics read more


space.com

Universe Expansion Detective Story Examined with New Tool

July 18, 2018

“This is like a detective story, where inconsistent evidence or testimony could lead to solving the puzzle.” — Dr. Mustapha Ishak-Boushaki, professor of astrophysics  read more


The Dallas Morning News

Can Neuroscience Stop the Opioid Epidemic? Curious Texas Investigates

July 17, 2018

“We can talk all we want about the opioid epidemic, [but] it's a pain epidemic. … Until we get a handle on why people are having pain and how we can stop it, you're not addressing the underlying problem.” — Dr. Greg Dussor, Fellow, Eugene McDermott Professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


The Dallas Morning News

5 Simple Ways to Healthier Eating, from Dallas Nutrition Pros

July 16, 2018

"Once they have mastered the first thing, it's easier to keep gradually adding to their routine.” — Sara Asberry, nutritionist at the Student Wellness Center read more


Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Dont Trust the Media? Surprise: We Have Our Doubts, Too. But Were Not Fake News

July 14, 2018

“People in the news media believe that somebody farther from their own social circle is less ethical, and the closer they are, the more ethical.” — Dr. Angela M. Lee, assistant professor in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication.   read more


KERA-FM

Brain Health Program Helps Dallas Police Officers Fight Information Overload

July 11, 2018

“An amazing amount of tactical training goes into each one of these people. What we're doing is giving them some cognitive tools to help them think about the information.” — Dr. Jennifer Zientz, head of clinical services at the Center for BrainHealth read more


The Dallas Morning News

California Real Estate Startup Enters Dallas Market Offering Cheaper Home-Buying Option

July 11, 2018

“They say, ‘I’d rather pony up and pay [established commissioned brokers] however much than ignorantly lose even more.” — Dr. Randall S. Guttery, director of real estate programs read more


The Dallas Morning News

Dallas Nonprofits Join to Support Family Center and Push the Bachman Lake Area Forward

July 6, 2018

"It is in everybody's best interest and it has been found over and over in research that kids in disadvantaged backgrounds don't always have access to quality programs, and they should." — Dr. Emily Touchstone, professor of behavioral and brain science read more


The Dallas Morning News

Dallas Real Estate Startup Door Is on a Tear, But Is the Disruption in Full Effect?

July 5, 2018

"That's where Door is so well-placed and well-suited. … Door is very tech savvy, and they've put a lot of effort into social media, online marketing and so on." — Dr. Randall S. Guttery, director of real estate programs read more


KERA

The Explosive Science Behind Fireworks

July 4, 2018

“They didn't have a lot of color with them. That happened much later. They originally started off as being for the rich and then slowly became for the masses.” — Dr. Amy Walker, professor of materials science and engineering read more


HealthDay

Fireworks Are Hard on Your Hearing

July 4, 2018

"The inner ear contains delicate hair cells which do not regrow. Once these are damaged by noise, the result is permanent hearing impairment.” — Dr. Jackie Clark, clinical professor of audiology read more


Reuters

Gun Injuries Twice as Common for City Kids

July 2, 2018

"Assaults may be more common gun injuries in urban areas because those areas tend to suffer disproportionately from violent (especially firearm-related) crimes compared to rural areas due in large part to the intersections between gangs, drugs, guns, and offending and victimization more generally." — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


The Dallas Morning News

Want to Lower Your Risk of Depression and Dying from Heart Disease? Do This

June 27, 2018

"If you do have a cardiovascular event, you are better protected against the potential detrimental effects on the brain, such as depression, memory and concentration deficits." — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director at the Center for BrainHealth read more


Austin American-Statesman

PolitiFact: Claim of $1B Giveaway on Stadium Gets a Red Card

June 27, 2018

“Anything that far out in the future — 80 years — is a pretty crazy thing to try to guess.  In general, that is just a huge time frame.” — Dr. Clint Peinhardt, associate professor of political science read more


D Magazine

Closing the Gender Gap in Tech

June 27, 2018

“If we go back to the ’80s, we did not have the problem we have now. We still weren’t at equality, but we’ve had a steady decline in women choosing tech.” — Dr. Janell Straach, senior lecturer of computer science read more


The Atlantic

Earthquakes and Volcanoes May Have Helped Intelligent Life Evolve

June 26, 2018

“I think you can get life without plate tectonics. I think we did. I don’t think you can get us without plate tectonics.” — Dr. Robert Stern, professor of geosciences read more


Reuters

Portable Music Players Tied to Hearing Loss in Kids

June 21, 2018

“Limiting music player use should be considered as part of an overall safe listening strategy.” — Dr. Colleen Le Prell, Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor in Hearing Science read more


Reader's Digest

20 Genius Habits Your 80-Year-Old Brain Will Thank You for Doing Today

June 21, 2018

“The strongest mental habit is to pursue deeper level thinking.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director at the Center for BrainHealth read more


WFAA-TV

Parkinson's Patients Find Joy, Relief from Symptoms Through Dance

June 21, 2018

“Really the resilience and the human spirit that keeps everyone coming back to class, that's what I see.” — Misty Owens, dance faculty member read more


NPR

The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup Strategy

June 18, 2018

“If you see lots of faces early in life, if you learn all the important distinguishing features for different races, then you can use them easily.” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Møller Professor read more


The Dallas Morning News

What Health Care CEOs Can Do to Help Doctors Do the Job They Were Trained For

June 18, 2018

“The implications are sobering as professionals with unprecedented passion, decades of educational preparation, and significant professional experience are exhausted, dissatisfied and frustrated.” — Dr. Britt Berrett, director of the Center for Healthcare Leadership and Management read more


The Dallas Morning News

Even in Death, Margaret McDermott Creates a 'Transformative' Moment for Her Beloved Dallas Museum of Art

June 15, 2018

“The DMA now has four paintings by Monet, and, with the McDermott [collection], it will have seven. ... Its four wonderful major works by Degas will be joined by two masterpieces.” — Dr. Rick Brettell, the Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair of Art and Aesthetic Studies and the Edith O’Donnell Distinguished University Chair read more


The Washington Post

Five Myths about Alzheimer's disease

June 15, 2018

“Clinical trials have found that by the time Alzheimer’s is diagnosed, it is too late to intervene with anti-amyloid agents.” — Dr. Denise Park, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


Reuters

Vigorous Exercise May Not Keep Dementia from Worsening

June 14, 2018

“The most surprising finding is that physical exercise could potentially be a detriment, since the dementia has progressed a little more rapidly with exercise.”  — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director at the Center for BrainHealth read more


Austin American-Statesman

Homelessness, Limited Access to Medical Care Among Top Issues Affecting LGBTQ Communities in Texas, Study Finds

June 13, 2018

“Someone might be courteous to you as a doctor, but they might not be clinically trained to treat needs specific to the LGBT or transgender community.” — Dr. Kara Sutton, sociology lecturer read more


National Post

Despite Public Criticism over String of Recent Missteps, Pollsters Nail Ontario Election

June 12, 2018

“Pollsters have put a lot of effort into trying to improve their samples and so forth. It is sometimes in reaction to the criticism that they’ve taken.” — Dr. Harold Clarke, Ashbel Smith Professor  read more


KERA-FM

Do Current Active Shooter Drills Work? Abbott's Plan Offers One Way to Change Them

June 12, 2018

“There’s no research that documents a level of detail asking shooters whether they’ve sought out particular targets because they have had certain kinds of drills or not.” — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


KTVT-TV

UT Dallas Cultivating Interest in STEM Careers Among Teen Boys

June 4, 2018

“Our purpose is to engage, expose and for our kids to reflect on what they learn.” — Marcus Robinson, program director for the Urban STEM Residential Camp read more


The Dallas Morning News

We Can Improve School Safety by Identifying Kids with Severe Antisocial Behavior and Offering Help

May 31, 2018

“Efforts aimed at identifying individuals who exhibit severe antisocial tendencies and providing them the services they need should be a high priority, and this should not be limited solely to teenagers.” — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology  read more


The Wall Street Journal

After Santa Fe School Shooting, Texas Town Grapples With Bullying

May 29, 2018

“There were certainly situations where they were shunned by classmates, but they weren’t bullied. Their peers were afraid of them or not interested in interacting with them.” — Dr. Nadine Connell, associate professor of criminology and director of the Center for Crime and Justice Studies read more


Texas Standard

Is the Amazon Echo In Your Kitchen Recording Your Every Word?

May 29, 2018

“In the future, hackers and others can try to hack into these devices, and they can try to record entire conversations.” — Dr. Murat Kantarcioglu, professor of computer science read more


The Dallas Morning News

False Rape Allegation During DWI Stop Shows How Body Cams Can Bulletproof Arrests

May 25, 2018

“It creates a public record of the particular incident, and it can exonerate or damn an officer, essentially, rather than relying on word of mouth — the he-said she-said. It’ll never be perfect, because it’s limited in what it captures.” — Dr. Andrew Wheeler, assistant professor of criminology read more


The 74

Criminologist Nadine Connell on Why She's Building a 30-Year Database of School Shootings and What Hidden Lessons May Be Found in the Stats

May 22, 2018

“The number of rampage-like incidents remains extremely low, and they are a relatively small subsection of the shootings we are analyzing.” — Dr. Nadine Connell, associate professor of criminology  read more


The Dallas Morning News

Cornyn's Bill to Shrink the Prison Population Will Reduce Crime and Costs

May 21, 2018

“It relies on the development and utilization of risk assessment tools that will help more accurately sort prisoners to the kinds of treatment programs that may be most beneficial to them.” — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


KDFW-TV

Laurel or Yanny? Hearing Expert Weighs In on the Debate

May 17, 2018

“This is in some ways a perfect example of how we hear with our ears but listen with our brains.” — Dr. Ed Lobarinas, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


The Atlantic

How Income Affects the Brain

May 15, 2018

“We’re starting to learn more about the impact of both stress and continuous learning on the brain. It’s consistent with the idea that lifelong experiences might influence brain health.” — Dr. Gagan Wig, assistant professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


KXAS-TV

Impacts of Moving the US Embassy in Israel

May 14, 2018

“I think in the next two to three years you will see two to three dozen, at least if not actually physically moving, declaring that their intention to move.” — Dr. David Patterson, Hillel A. Feinberg Chair in Holocaust Studies read more


The Dallas Morning News

Margaret McDermott, a Giant in Dallas Philanthropy, Lauded as a Legend at Her Memorial Service

May 8, 2018

“I think [Mrs. Margaret McDermott] did more, accomplished more and enjoyed life more in a calendar year than we ordinary folk can manage in three.” — Dr. Hobson Wildenthal, executive vice president read more


KXAS-TV

Self-Driving Vehicles Hit Frisco Streets in July

May 7, 2018

“To really have something people can use on a daily basis, just like they use a regular taxi, a lot more research has to happen.” — Dr. Gopal Gupta, Erik Jonsson Chair read more


Reuters

Police Violence Takes Most Years of Life from Youth and People of Color

May 7, 2018

“When these realities are combined with the fact that minorities are over-represented in residing in those communities, it sets the stage for the disproportionality that emerges from the study’s findings.” — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


Post-Tribune

Face Facts: Immigrants Commit Fewer Crimes Than U.S.-Born Peers

May 4, 2018

“In my view, all kinds of crime, but especially violent crime, are horrible regardless of who commits them, and we should be doing all we can to prevent those acts from occurring.” — Dr. Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


Reuters

Booze, Drugs, Skipping Earplugs Linked to Hearing Loss at Concerts

May 4, 2018

“The repetition of loud sound exposures and repeated injury to the inner ear can ultimately result in permanent damage, and permanent hearing loss, for which there is no cure.” — Dr. Colleen Le Prell, Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor of Hearing Science read more


The Washington Post

Fatal Police Shootings of Unarmed People Have Significantly Declined, Experts Say

May 3, 2018

“When you only look at the worst outcomes, it’s hard to say if this marks a real change or is random chance.” — Dr. Andrew P. Wheeler, assistant professor of criminology read more


KERA-FM

The Way Chronic Pain Begins Could Be Different For Men and Women, Study Says

May 2, 2018

"What we found was that a certain kind of dopamine receptor plays a key role in modulating chronic pain or producing chronic pain in males and a completely different receptor plays a role in doing the same thing in females." — Dr. Ted Price BS’97, associate professor of neuroscience read more


The Dallas Morning News

Mexican Presidential Candidates Face Off in First Debate with Clear Lead in Polls for Leftist Leader

April 21, 2018

“The incoming president will have to navigate an increasingly complicated diplomatic reality with the United States. All these issues involve Texas in significant ways.” — Dr. Monica Rankin, director of the Center for U.S. Latin American Initiatives read more


The Atlantic

How Exactly Does Autism Muddy Communication?

April 19, 2018

“[Adults with autism] tended to be louder when they were speaking, and they also took a longer period of time to say the statements than the controls.” — Dr. Noah Sasson, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


KXAS-TV

Health Risks of Emotional Eating Among Children

April 17, 2018

“If we remember that food is for nourishment and that we should listen to our internal cues of hunger and fullness, then our kids are less likely to be at risk for being overweight and other eating problems." — Dr. Shayla C. Holub, head of the psychological sciences PhD program read more


The Globe and Mail

Is Chocolate the Key to Children's Happiness?

March 29, 2018

“It’s fine to do everything in moderation. It’s when we use food to praise or to reward that the dangers lie.” — Dr. Shayla C. Holub, head of the psychological sciences PhD program read more


The Dallas Morning News

We Can't Solve School Gun Violence Until We Understand Why It Keeps Happening

March 26, 2018

“But we do not have a thorough understanding of the causes of gun violence at our schools, and without more information, we risk creating uninformed policies with potentially harmful effects.” — Dr. Nadine Connell, associate professor of criminology read more


Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Did Russians Already Try to Mess With Texas Elections and Fort Worth This Year?

March 22, 2018

"The fact that they are using Russian email addresses suggest they aren't really trying to hide anything. So maybe this is just an attempt to create some confusion and sow doubt in the overall integrity of the process." — Dr. Robert Lowry, political science professor  read more


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